OER Rapid Innovation: SupOERGlue and RIDLR

8 March 2012

We heard a few days ago that 2 of the project proposals we submitted to the recent JISC HEA OER Rapid Innovation call, had been funded.

The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) and the Higher Education Academy (HEA) invites institutions to submit funding proposals for Projects to enhance digital infrastructure to support open content for education.

We are very grateful to the JISC and the HEA, and to the review panel for deeming our proposals worthy of funding.

I thought it might be interesting to tell you a bit more about our two projects, which we are very excited about. They run concurrently from March - October 2012, and both received roughly £25k each from the JISC/HEA. Both work on extensions to Newcastle University's unique Dynamic Learning Maps curriculum delivery system. We await the detail of gthe condicitons of funding from the Programme Manager, Amber Thomas, with anticipation.

RIDLR

Project Director: Simon Cotterill

Project Manager: Suzanne Hardy

Technical development: James Outterside

We are thrilled to be working with, learning from and drawing on the expertise of  the JLeRN team and Pat Lockley in Rapid Innovation with Dynamic learning maps and the Learning Registry (RIDLR).

Project description

Newcastle University's Dynamic Learning Maps system (developed with JISC funding) is well established in the first three years (Phase 1) of the MBBS curriculum, about to be rolled out in Phase 2.

Interest from the Royal Veterinary College and University of Bradford is beginning to see wider uptake of this innovative approach to curriculum delivery, which already collects sophisticated 'paradata' (usage information about educational resources).

The Learning Registry is a US funded initiative with an experimental UK node (The JLeRN Experiment) designed to share paradata to encourage networks and communities built around shared interests, with the possibility to increase uptake of open educational resources and practices.

In RIDLR we will test the release of contextually rich paradata via the JLeRN Experiment to the Learning Registry and harvest back paradata about prescribed and additional personally collected resources used within and to augment the MBBS curriculum, to enhance the experience of teachers and learners.

Digital resource discovery is difficult for teachers and learners because high quality educational resources are widely distributed. Finding open educational resources (OER) and other materials related to specific topics is difficult and time consuming. In RIDLR we will apply innovative approaches to help address this issue with dynamic harvesting of OER for specific topics displayed within the context of the curriculum and personal learning maps enhanced with semantic matching techniques, drawing together terminology from both formal metadata and common language (aka 'folksonomy').

RIDLR builds on existing JISC-funded projects; Dynamic Learning Maps (DLM), interactive curriculum and personal learning maps; and a JISC-CETIS miniproject to prototype OER-specific social bookmarking and seeks to integrate with Learning Registry data to encourage personalised learning and teaching experiences.

The team will draw on its extensive expertise with OER including leading five projects in the JISC UK OER programmes to work closely with the JLeRN Experiment and its early adopters.

We will develop open APIs to harvest and release paradata on OER from end-users (bookmarks, tags, comments, ratings and reviews etc) from the Learning Registry and other sources for specific topics, within the context of curriculum and personal maps. These will in turn be openly released to the community, and use cases documented and shared.

Teachers and learners will benefit from contextualised curricular access to topic-specific OER and from more sophisticated searching for resources and viewing related paradata, augmenting prescribed resources and enabling a more cohesive and personalised experience.

140 character summary: Dynamic Learning Maps meets Learning Registry UK node (JLeRN) to harvest OERs for specific topics within curriculum and personal learning maps and share paradata.

Use case

Student perspective

A 2nd year student of the Newcastle MBBS programme is searching for graphical resources related to 'German measles'.

In DLM they see a list of closely associated terms, derived from instances where that term and related terms appear in the MBBS curriculum, together with associated curriculum resources.

They would normally resort to Google to search for images and related material online which is fairly laborious, and it is easy to get distracted.Alternatively, the DLM system harvests OER, social bookmarks and other freely available resources, such as material from Jorum, NICE (guidelines) and NHS Evidence with related metadata /titles, and presents these as part of the student's initial search.

DLM integration with OER Bookmarking (with the facility to sort by relevance, licence, ratings and other cross-site criteria) enables the student to bookmark and rate/review potentially useful materials for their work or revision creating contextually rich paradata automatically enabled for sharing openly.

Other 2nd year MBBS students comment on and rate the found resources from within the system, and their reviews/ratings are shared internally. The newly augmented resources, bookmarks, tags, comments, ratings and reviews are shared openly via the JLeRN Experiment into the Learning Registry.

Related external paradata about resources within DLM are harvested from the Learning Registry via the JLeRN Experiment, and DLM attaches these external usage data to the original resource metadata.

Student choices of open educational resources to complement prescribed curriculum resources are validated, and potential external networks of like-minded individuals worldwide and from other educational programmes centred on situated shared topics directly related to the curriculum are made available.

Staff perspective

A lecturer in anatomy has a lecture to deliver in two weeks time and decides to update their presentation with openly licensed content after attending a workshop on risk management in learning and teaching resources.

They go to DLM to find their lecture presentation from the previous year, and the system presents them with a set of possible external OER related to the topic of that lecture. Integration with LR paradata about these resources enables the lecturer to see what her peers say about those OER, and what they have used them for.

The lecturer's choice of replacement content for her presentation is facilitated by these external data.The lecturer updates her lecture with OER content and re-uploads it to DLM, together with dynamically generated paradata on how she has incorporated new content. She adds 2 reviews of the OER she was presented with in from DLM.

SupOERGlue

Project Director: Suzanne Hardy

Project Manager: Lindsay Wood

Technical development: John Peterson

Partner: We are delighted to be working with Tatamae to integrate OERGlue into DLM in this project and are grateful to Pat Lockley for making this introduction.

Project description

SuperOERGlue will pilot the integration of OER Glue with Newcastle University's Dynamic Learning Maps, enabling easy content creation and aggregation from within the learning and teaching support environments, related to specific topics.

Creating digital resources for learning and teaching traditionally involves teachers working closely with learning technologists who have the IT skills required to turn draft content and ideas into sophisticated resources capable of realising the teacher's vision.

Alternatively teachers comfortable with IT learn these skills. This has been restricted to the enthusiastic few who have the time and inclination to up skill themselves, or those able to be assisted by small numbers of learning technology support staff.

Knowledge and use of open licenses for sharing such content has been limited to those curious enough to explore the area, usually in isolation. With the advent of new content creation and aggregation tools such as OER Glue, the creation and sharing process has become much easier.

In this project we will apply innovative approaches to help address the challenges of OER creation with dynamic harvesting of OER for specific topics displayed within the context of the curriculum and personal learning maps.

SupOERGlue builds on recently completed JISC-funded projects; Dynamic Learning Maps (DLM), interactive curriculum and personal learning maps; and a JISC-CETIS miniproject to prototype OER-specific social bookmarking.

Partnering with Tatemae to use OER Glue, which harvests OER from around the world and has developed innovative ways for academics and learners to aggregate customised learning packages constructed of different OER, will enable staff and students to create their own personalised resource mashups which are directly related to specific topics in the curriculum.

This will open and encourage more digital content creation practice, and ensure risk free resources with the ability to share by encouraging explicit use of openly licensed content inherently connected to teaching and learning episodes.

The team will draw on its extensive expertise with OER including leading five projects in the JISC UK OER programmes. We will draw in resources from OER Glue and other sources for specific topics, displayed in the context of curriculum and personal maps. Data on OER from end-users (bookmarks, tags, comments, ratings and reviews aka 'paradata') will also be collected.

The process will be carefully documented and the resulting case studies together with source code will be openly released.

Teachers and learners will benefit from contextualised curricular access to topic-specific OER and from more sophisticated searching for resources and viewing related paradata, augmenting prescribed resources and enabling a more personalised experience. 

Use case

A 2nd year student of the Newcastle MBBS programme is searching for graphical resources related to 'German measles'.

In DLM they see a list of closely associated terms, derived from instances where that term and related terms appear in the MBBS curriculum, together with associated curriculum resources.

They would normally resort to Google to search for images and related material online which is fairly laborious, and it is easy to get distracted.

Alternatively, the DLM system harvests OER, social bookmarks and other freely available resources, such as material from Jorum, NICE (guidelines) and NHS Evidence with related metadata /titles, and presents these as part of the student's initial search. DLM integration with OER Bookmarking (with the facility to sort by relevance, licence, ratings and other cross-site criteria) enables the student to bookmark potentially useful materials for their work or revision.

Once a set of resources has been bookmarked the student may decide that the best way to illustrate their point would be to take a bit of one resource, with a bit from another together with some sections from the formal prescribed material from the programme.

Using OER Glue, they drag and drop bits and pieces from several webpages into a new page, linked to collaboration tools, which then begins to distil the student's ideas into a brand new resource, which they can then share with peers, who in turn may choose to change and augment that material (or rate it).

Peers may also comment on and rate the found resources from within the system.

The newly created resources, bookmarks, tags, comments, ratings and reviews might be useful to wider communities, which could in turn be shared via for example Jorum and the Learning Registry.

140 characater summary: Will pilot the integration of Tatamae's OER Glue with Dynamic Learning Maps, enabling teachers and learners to generate custom content by aggregating and sequencing OERs related to specific topics.

Related tags: hea, Jisc, OER, oer phase 3, OER Projects, oerri, project, rapid innovation, RIDLR, supoerglue, ukoer, usecase

Posted by: Suzanne Hardy

Posted in: Suzanne's blog, OER rapid innovation: RIDLR, OER rapid innovation: SupOERGlue, OER phase 3 blog

Reader comments

Paul Evans - 27 March 2012 @ 11:01:09

I have tried that OER bookmarking. It is quite good and really really helpful but I think the only problem with it is that there is no privacy setting/option to hide my bookmarks.

 
 
MEDEV, School of Medical Sciences Education Development,
Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, NE2 4HH

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